BALANCE by Nadine Fumiko Schaub

FASHION FILMS, STORIES
In need of a new set of scales? How about trying something else.
Balance is a project by Swiss/Japanese designer Nadine Fumiko Schaub, created as an alternative to cheap and replaceable kitchen appliances. It is made entirely of durable and natural materials such as wood, porcelain, brass and marble stone that has been locally crafted. These scales doe not have a display, instead it relies on human touch to tell if the weights are balanced.

 

photo credit: http://www.nadineschaub.ch/?p=948

MADE IN CORK

STORIES
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It seems cork is having its moment in fashion and design. It found its way to interior design, being used to create various types of textured walls, tables, chairs, or table decorations. Similarly, fashion designers use this material to give natural structure and character to its pieces. Except for its natural character, cork has another great feature – it is entirely sustainable! The bark from which cork made renews itself and trees do not need to be cut down to harvest it.

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ADAISM
Designer Annett Bourquin who is behind ADAISM label takes inspiration from her time spent in Japan and years of traveling the world, creating simple and considered objects calling on minimalist concepts and natural fabrics.
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MATT & NAT
MATT & NAT are committed to not using leather or any other animal-based materials in their designs. They have been experimenting with different recycled materials such as recycled nylons, cardboard, rubber and cork.
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PELCOR
Portuguese brand – PELCOR – focuses entirely on cork and creates a range of accessories including clutches and even dog collars and leashes.

JEWELLERY | AUTOCTONA Stacking rings

DESIGNERS
AUTOCTONA – a design studio we simply fell in love with – is aiming for a contemporary reinterpretation of the concept of the amulet, reflecting contemporary minimalism vis a vis femininity and esoterica. They create truly timeless wearable objects and combine passion for traditional craftsmanship and sustainable practices. It’s quite interesting that rather than creating collections based on season, their work evolves naturally – the stacking rings  featured below explore the concept of fractures.

FACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA - THE HALF FACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA - WOOD STACKFACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA - TREFACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA -THE SLICEFACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA -IL QUARTO  FACTORY OF FASHION - AUTOCTONA - BIANCO E NERO

Fashion Revolution Day | #whomademyclothes?

EVENTS
Have you noticed a few people around or on social media wearing their clothes reversed last year? Well that time of the year comes again TOMORROW – 24th April – the day that marks the second anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster in Dhaka, Bangladesh, which killed 1133, and injured over 2500 people.
Fashion Revolution Day FACTORY OF FASHION
The idea behid the Fashion Revolution Day initiative is for people around the world to challenge global fashion brands to demonstrate commitment to transparency across the length of the value chain, from farmers to factory workers, brands to buyers and consumers – by us asking #whomademyclothes?
“Buying is only the last step in a long journey involving hundreds of people: the invisible workforce behind the clothes we wear. We no longer know the people who made our clothes so therefore it is easy to turn a blind eye and as a result, millions of people are suffering, even dying.” (Carry Somers, Fashion Revolution co-founder)
One in six people worldwide work in the global fashion supply chain. It is the most labour dependent industry on the planet, yet the people who make our clothes are hidden from us, often at their own expense, a symptom of the broken links across the fashion industry.
Orsola de Castro, co-founder said: “Fashion Revolution is about building a future where an accident like this never happens again. We believe knowing who made our clothes is the first step in transforming the fashion industry. Knowing who made our clothes requires transparency, and this implies openness, honesty, communication and accountability. It’s about re-connecting broken links and celebrating the relationship between shoppers and the people who make our clothes, shoes, accessories and jewellery – all the things we call fashion.”
Sounds like something you’d like to take part in? Then here’s how:
Take a selfie with the label in your clothing showing, send it to a brand via social media, asking ‘who made my clothes?’ #whomademyclothes and share their reply. Add hashtag #factoryoffashion if you’d like your photo to be added on our social media.

FACTORY OF FASHION - Fashion Revolution Day 2015

Tens of thousands of people across the globe did this last year and more are expected to take part in the campaign this April. FACTORY OF FASHION <#factoryoffashion> will certainly do their best to support the idea!
Feel like socialising? Find Fashion Revolution event in your local area here!